In Japan, sex dolls are known as "Dutch wives" (ダッチワイフ datchi waifu), which now refers to relatively inexpensive dolls. Their name originates from the term, possibly English, for the thick rattan or bamboo bolster, used to aid sleep in humid countries by keeping one's limbs lifted above sweaty sheets. Orient Industry is considered to be the leading manufacturer of high-end silicone dolls in Japan,[13] which started using another term "love dolls" (ラブドール rabu dōru) around 1998 to distinguish their dolls from the image of inflatable dolls associated with the term "Dutch wife".[14] The term has stuck and is now used generally to refer to any high-end product. There is a business, Doru no Mori (Doll Forest) in Tokyo, that rents love dolls and rooms to male customers.[15][16] In March 2007 the Japanese daily Mainichi Shimbun newspaper reported that there are also rental businesses that bring the dolls to the customer's home, and that the specialist love-doll magazine i-doloid has a print-run of 10,000 copies per issue.[17] Butt Toys
While a penis ring might not be the first thing you think of when it comes to sex toys, this is not your average penis ring. The Lelo Tor is made of silky silicone and vibrates to give you tons of clitoral stimulation during penetrative sex. You can wear it with the vibrator on top or on the bottom of his shaft for different sensations, and it's also rechargeable, waterproof, and comes with six built-in settings. 
By the 1980s, purges of the police force along with new and tighter licensing controls by the City of Westminster led to a crackdown on illegal premises in Soho. In the early 1990s, London's Hackney council sought to shut down Sh! Women's Erotic Emporium, because they did not have a licence. Sh! took the council to court and consequently won the right to remain open as there were no sufficient reasons for the closure. In 2003 the Ann Summers chain of lingerie and sex toy shops won the right to advertise for shop assistants in Job Centres, which was originally banned under restrictions on what advertising could be carried out by the sex industry.[13] In 2007, a Northern Ireland sex shop was denied a licence by the Belfast City Council. The shop appealed and won, but this was overturned by the House of Lords.[14] Sexshop
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