The etymology of the word dildo is unclear. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) describes the word as being of "origin unknown".[3] One theory is that it originally referred to the phallus-shaped peg used to lock an oar in position on a dory (small boat). It would be inserted into a hole on the side of the boat, and is very similar in shape to the modern toy. The sex toy might take its name from this sailing tool, which also lends its name to the town of Dildo and the nearby Dildo Island in Newfoundland, Canada. Others suggest the word is a corruption of Italian diletto "delight".[4]

A dildo is a non-vibrating device which is used for sexual stimulation of the vagina or anus. Dildos are generally made of silicone rubber, but can be made of other materials such as body safe metals such as titanium, stainless steel, aluminium, or glass. They are often made to resemble a penis, although some are C-shaped or S-shaped for G-spot or P-spot stimulation.
The Kinky Kim blow-up doll is perfect for those who lust after their favorite reality TV star. This lifelike sex doll bears a strong resemblance to a woman who clearly loves sex and revels in showing off her slammin’ body every chance she gets. Looking for a male blow up doll for a bachelorette party or a gift for your best friend (or yourself)? We have many options, from the fit, trim and very sexy Tasty Tyrone to Boy-Toy Brad. Sexual Massage Oil
Sex toys are a fantastic and affordable way to spice up one’s sex life without venturing outside of the relationship, or inviting a third party to join in on the sexy festivities. Since both of these previous sexual seasoning methods come with their own set of complications that can lead toward a relationship’s demise, we consider sex toys to be a safe alternative — literally. (Sex toys don’t come with their own set of feelings, preferences, or STIs, making them fun for everyone.) Although some men may view sex toys as a threat to their own lovemaking skills, studies show that the idea is becoming less intimidating and more broadly accepted.
By the 1980s, purges of the police force along with new and tighter licensing controls by the City of Westminster led to a crackdown on illegal premises in Soho. In the early 1990s, London's Hackney council sought to shut down Sh! Women's Erotic Emporium, because they did not have a licence. Sh! took the council to court and consequently won the right to remain open as there were no sufficient reasons for the closure. In 2003 the Ann Summers chain of lingerie and sex toy shops won the right to advertise for shop assistants in Job Centres, which was originally banned under restrictions on what advertising could be carried out by the sex industry.[13] In 2007, a Northern Ireland sex shop was denied a licence by the Belfast City Council. The shop appealed and won, but this was overturned by the House of Lords.[14] Sexshop
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